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Emilia Romagna

Considered by many to be the region of fun, joy and good times. A union of two distinct souls, on the one hand Emilia, the cradle of Italy's most real and most authentic food and wine traditions, and eating and drinking well. Romagna the home of fun and lightheartedness.
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Award 3 Bicchieri i

This wine has been awarded by the Gambero Rosso Guide.

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Award 5 Grappoli i

This wine has been awarded by the Bibenda Guide.

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Award 3 Bicchieri i

This wine has been awarded by the Gambero Rosso Guide.

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This product is not subject to discounts and coupon application.

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This product is not subject to discounts and coupon application.

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Emilia Romagna

Production areas 

The route between Modena and Reggio Emilia is the most important for the production of Lambrusco wine, in all its forms. Bologna and its magnificent hills are an emerging territory with still so much to be discovered, with big reds and lively whites. Romagna, with its vineyards perched on hills overlooking the sea, descending gradually down towards the Adriatic coast, is the largest Sangiovese production area outside of Tuscany. 

Grape varieties and production 

When we talk about Lambrusco, it would be more accurate to talk about Lambruscos, as there are several families of Lambrusco: Maestri, Grasparossa, and Sorbara, to name but a few – here we are talking about worlds, tastes and styles. Pignoletto, native to Bologna, is the pride of Emilia Romagna, vinified both still, semi-sparkling or sparkling, it is lively and playful. Sangiovese and Romagna, a grape that lends itself to various nuances, from rosé to a young red to a big red, which can always excite and make a strong mark on a territory, without trying to match nearby Tuscany. 

Characteristics 

The Lambrusco Grasparossa and Maestri wines are particularly widespread in Reggio Emilia and explode into bright red and violet colours. They are soft and enveloping sparkling wines rich in blackberry, blueberry, and ripe cherry. The Sorbara variety from Modena is a fresh-tasting, thirst-quenching rosé bursting with grapefruit, pomegranate, and raspberry. Bologna’s Pignoletto is slightly aromatic, with ripe peach and apple, citrus, and almond hints on the palate to finish, especially in the still version. Sangiovese di Romagna is more fruity, soft and instant than its Tuscan neighbour. Unrivalled in the rosé and young versions, it is also interesting when aged. 

Pairings 

Regional cuisine is too rich and varied not to offer wonderful and unmissable pairing options. Any type and variety of Lambrusco will combine well with the opulence of Emilia Romagna’s cured meats, cheeses and fried dumplings. Pignoletto complements a Bolognese Tortellini dish like few other wines. Both the rosé and young red Sangiovese di Romagna wines find a great match in rich fish-based dishes from the Romagna coast.