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Wines to pair with White meats

Flavoursome, spicy and aromatic meat dishes are often paired with red wine. White wine is recommended for white meat, depending on the type or origin. Often a dry white wine can enhance a meat dish and enhance its flavour profile. Discover the best white wines with great personality, excellent with simple meals.
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White meats

White or red wine? The perfect wine to pair with white meats

Meat can be prepared in various ways: stewed, boiled, braised, grilled or as raw carpaccio. The secret is knowing how to find the right wine to enhance the olfactory and taste persistence, and this does not necessarily occur with a glass of  red wine. To find the perfect wine, it is important to know more about the fundamental rules for tasting meat with wine, based on the colour and how it is cooked. White meats, such as poultry, turkey, and rabbit, differ in the delicateness of their taste and tenderness, which is why white wines are preferred that can enhance their simplicity, especially when the meat is grilled. Although roast chicken can also be enjoyed with a rosé wine, light or medium-bodied  white wines remain the ideal choice to enhance the taste of white meat.

How wine’s aromas enhance white meat

Generally, white meat is soft and tends to be slightly sweet, as well as having a discreet aroma when seasoned. The greasy sensation on the palate should be cleansed by a soft wine with a good structure and strong acidic inclination. A pairing recommendation in this case could be a white wine like Chardonnay from the Langhe or a Tuscan Vermentino which, thanks to their ABV and extreme freshness, refresh the palate and leave a hint of minerals. If you prefer something spicier like chicken curry, where the seasoning dominates, you need a wine with a good length and aroma, which can support the varied, pungent fragrances of the dish. In this case, you could choose a Soave Classico from Veneto or a Chardonnay from Tuscany.

Rosé wine creates the perfect pairing

Rosé wines are perfect in almost any situation, but their freshness and length make them a great pairing for tasty meat dishes. Thanks to its versatility, rosé is a wine that even combines well with flavours that are very different from each other, such as a hamburger without a bun with flavoured sauces, white meats, grilled pork fillets and, in general, it is perfect with lean meat recipes with a tomato sauce. It has also helped to legitimise the production of some designations in recent years, especially in the world of sparkling wines.

Taste and flavour experiences

No, it is not the time for utter madness. These days, we can no longer be inflexible about certain pairings, we should be driven by the passion of the tasting experience. Wine lovers know that to define the meat-wine pairing, there are several variables to consider. Many people overlook the fact that an arista di maiale (Tuscan roast pork loin) has very different organoleptic properties to a fiorentina steak or mince cooked in a tomato sauce. But in front of a good barbecue, there is nothing better than a lovely glass of full-bodied, firmly structured red wine to balance out the succulence of red meats in general.